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Excellent Open Video event in London – April 18-20th, 2013

Friday, March 22nd, 2013

Heads up folks! Spread the word!

xm:lab

Open Video Sprint London #ovforum
April 18-20, 2013
MS Stubnitz
openvideo@xmlab.org
Course, xm:lab report, Blog post

The  workshop / course sprint facilitated by Mick Fuzz from FLOSS Manuals  is part of the international Open Video series launched with the Open  Video Forum in 2012. The current version of the course, created at a  Berlin sprint last year, is part of the School of Open,a collaboration  between Creative Commons and P2P University.

Our goal is to produce an introductory course for open video  in the areas of end-user technologies (viewing, encoding, editing,  subtitling etc) and developer tools (transcoding, web applications,  developing for mobile devices).
This  course will be published as an OER (open educational resource). It will  promoted specifically as part of the Mokolo project supporting film and  developer networks in Africa, for example the recent Open Video Sudan event.
As the course is openly licensed it will be available for widespread use.
Ms Stubnitz Culture Ark

Location: London MS Stubnitz ship
Date: 18-20th April 2013

We are looking for people swimming in the sea of free software / open  source tools, open video frameworks and creating innovative learning.  Desirable skills include one or more of the following:

* Knowledge of open video for end user technologies or software development
* Writing skills in the area of open educational resources
* Experience in delivering workshops
* Connections to relevant networks to disseminate our work

If you are getting this email then we think this sounds like you. Would  you be interested in attending? Please get back to us if you think you  may be able to attend and we will inform you about the process and  logistics of this course sprint.

What’s in it for You:

* We’ll cover accommodation, meals, and have a small budget to include  travel expenses (so lets us know if you need support asap, we’ll see  what we can do)
* We can offer small contributor stipends, depending on how long you can stay
* You get to be part of an ongoing effort to bring more people (especially from newer netcultures) into free software / open source debates around visual media via the creation of open educational resources (courses will be translated)
* You will leave with a set of resources to deliver workshops on open video and lots of new subject knowledge
* P2p education is perhaps the most significant change in the way (higher) education is organized – let’s make it work

Background Info:

A course sprint  is a way of rapidly creating and testing teaching resources. It is  based on the work of Adam Hyde on Book Sprints and is one of FLOSS  Manuals tools of rapid, collaborative content creation. Course sprints are a  space for participants to learn from each other, find synergies in our  knowledge, and in the process, create innovative online learning  resources.
http://www.flossmanuals.org/service/booksprints
We will use the Book Type software to immediately print materials from our online workspace at the end of the sprint.
http://www.sourcefabric.org/en/booktype/

MS Stubniz is a mobile location for performance, arts, music and other odd stuff.
This  is the last month that the ship is moored in London, why not take  advantage of this opportunity to check it out before the boat sails.
http://ms.stubnitz.com/

Associated Events:

Sat  20th of April see Exploding Cinema event also taking place on MS  Stubniz – “a spray of DIY film, projection mapping, installation,  performance and video echo location”. For more info and call for work : film, performance  and music”.
http://www.explodingcinema.org/

Remote Collaboration:

If  you are unable to attend but want to input to the process via remote  collaboration or keep up to date of the outcomes please do:
* subscribe to the low-traffic Mokolo video list
* follow the #ovforum hashtag and @xmlabs_news account

Partners include:

xm:lab (Jan Tretschok, Soenke Zehle)
FLOSS Manuals (Mick Fuzz)
Deckspace (James Stevens, Adnan Hadzi)

Get your IP on at Innovate/Activate

Wednesday, April 18th, 2012

innovate activate logo banner

This weekend we’re getting intellectually proper with a whole slew of amazing people in the info activism community. This year has sold out, which is both great news for some and unfortunate for others. However, there’s still time to ask reddit Co-Founder Alexis Ohanian some questions.

reddit Co-Founder Alexis Ohanian

 

$25,000 prize: “Why Open Education Matters” Video Competition

Sunday, March 18th, 2012

Guest post by Timothy Vollmer, Creative Commons

Khan Academy has been killing it. The popular video education website now contains over 3,000 educational videos, with topics ranging from basic algebra to 17th century baroque painting. The Khan Academy videos are made available on their website under an open license which allows users to not only view the videos, but also incorporate the video in their websites and remix the videos for their customized educational needs. Khan has delivered almost 130 million of these video lessons to hungry learners online. The Khan Academy videos are Open Educational Resources–OER for short.

Open Educational Resources are free to use and always permit users to engage in the “4Rs”: they can revise, reuse, remix, and redistribute the OER. Online, these automatic permissions are super useful because they save teachers, students, and self learners the time, money, and effort of having to track down the owner and ask their permission to use the learning resource. Open Educational Resources have been around now for over 10 years. You may have heard of some big OER projects such as MIT OpenCourseWare or CK-12 open textbooks. Most Open Educational Resources are licensed under Creative Commons licenses.

The problem with OER is that not that many people know about them. So, Creative Commons, the U.S. Department of Education, and the Open Society Institute have teamed up to host the Why Open Education Matters video competition. We want people to create short videos that explains the benefits and promise of Open Educational Resources for teachers, students and schools everywhere. Even U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan is a champion of OER, and recorded a short video that introduces the contest. The first prize winner will be awarded $25,000, and we’ve lined up some great judges, including Nina Paley, Davis Guggenheim, and James Franco. Please jump in and share your creative video-making skills to explain and promote OER.

Submissions are due by June 5, 2012 on http://whyopenedmatters.org. We’re eating our own dog food too–any video that is submitted must be licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license so that it can be freely used and shared by anyone to help explain Open Educational Resources. Roll camera!